Jaime Gonzalez-Cabrera: Asian citrus psyllid (ACP)
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Jaime Gonzalez-Cabrera standing in front of the infestation-greenhouse at the CNRBC where the parasitoid Tamarixia radiata is mass-reared.

Jaime Gonzalez-Cabrera, a former UC MEXUS-CONACYT doctoral fellow who recently completed his Ph.D. in entomology, is currently conducting research at the National Reference Center for Biological Control (CNRBC) in Tecoman, Colima, Mexico. During his doctoral studies at UC Riverside, Gonzalez-Cabrera gained extensive theoretical and practical training in the mass rearing of parasitoids as biological alternatives to control agricultural and forestry pests. His dissertation, Quality Control and Captive Rearing Genetics of the Egg Parasitoid Trichogramma Pretiosum, explored common problems that occurred during artificial rearing such as unnoticed species replacement, morphological misidentification, insectary adaptation and inbreeding depression. His current research on the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, is of critical importance to the Mexican government because ACP can carry a deadly bacterial tree disease called Huanglongbing that kills grown citrus trees prematurely and could severely impact the citrus industry in Mexico (the 4th largest in the world). He is also conducting research on the ecto-parasitoid Tamarixia radiata Waterston, which is considered the more promising parasitoid to control ACP. Through his research, Gonzalez-Cabrera hopes to improve the quality and efficacy of the mass rearing system of Tamarixia radiata and, consequently, his findings may help to mitigate the damage and spread of ACP.

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CNRBC technician Manuel Bravo and Jaime Gonzalez-Cabrera assessing the degree of infestation of the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) on Murraya paniculata plants.